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The British-Israel Badge

Posted on 1 February 2017

The British--Israel Badge consists of the "Crossed Crosses of the Union Jack (without the blue field of the Saint Andrews flag) and with the initials "B.I." intertwined. It is the Old Testament Cross with the New Testament Cross overlaid.

The Diagonal White Cross, commonly known as the Saint Andrews Cross is the Old Testament Cross, the sign made by the Crossed Hands of Jacob in blessing the two sons of Joseph. (See Ge. 48: 12--20) It is the sign of multiplication and the symbol of fruitfulness, promised by God and foretold in Gen. 48:15--22; Gen.49; Deut.33; and many other passages of Scripture.

The Red Cross, the upright cross if the Cross of Saint George, which is both the Christian Cross and the old British Cross. The story of St. George and the Dragon is much more than a Fairy Tale. It is a deep symbolism and indicates the struggle between the forces of Good and the forces of Evil. Those who bear this emblem are enlisted under the Banner of Jesus the Christ, and are pledged to fight the Dragon of Evil in whatever guise he may appear.

This Cross is the sign of addition, the plus Sign. Both signs remind us of the promises of Almighty God to our forefather Abraham in Genesis 12, 13,15,17,21 and 22, wherein God promised that Abraham's seed would be as numerous as the sand on the seashore, and as the stars in the heaven, and that they would become a company of Nations.

To get the full significance of this emblem however, we must go back to the ancient Hebrew alphabet (not the present Hebrew, but the Archaic Hebrew in which the Old Testament Scriptures were first written) The Diagonal Cross was the letter "alpha", the first letter of the alphabet; and the upright cross was the letter "tau", the last letter of the alphabet; Thus we have Isaiah 41:4; 44:5,6; 48:12; Rev. 1:17. In Rev. Jesus uses the first and the last letters of the Greek alphabet.

June 1999
The Prophetic expositor

Tags: British Israel World Federation